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20120901
20120930
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)
worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides per year in the city of los angeles, not the county, the city. now, we have between 203 hundred homicides per year. people talk about the gang problem having been addressed. i want to share with you, what i experienced, what i have learned, i am not a typical academic. i will not quote statistics to you or talk about theories. i will talk with you about practicality. pragmatic approaches, and i will talk about reality. san francisco, like los angeles learned, will never saw or deal with its gang problems effectively unless there is true collaboration. i will talk to you about what this looks like and feels like. i will speak to you about the lessons that we have learned as law enforcement had to come off of the high perch,
with the unexpected consequences from their early infrastructure design. los angeles county is a land of sprawling development. with development comes hundreds of square miles of concrete, leaving no way for water to naturally soak into the ground. in areas of such widespread urbanization, flooding can be devastating. man: back in early 1930s, there was a flooding that took a lot of lives and property. as a result, the city of los angeles, in order to protect future flooding in the city, they decided to take the los angeles river and make it a flood control channel. they concreted the walls of the river in order for water to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to
he got my personnel file and my address, there is no transportation in los angeles -- there is nothing. he took three buses and hitchhiked, making it to my old frame house in venice. i said, why are you here? he said i was in a car and we did drive by and i don't know what to do. you said you would always be there for me. there's the answer and the question. how are we always going to be there for bobby. how are we going to help young people at risk, people who are active, to build new identities? we begin with tattoo removal, legal expunged and and we work on attachment. every individual who wants to avoid being in a gang, who wants to leave the game, they need a role model and mentor, they need someone to be there. there is no single type of person. we need it the merging of former gang members, prosecutors and social workers and public defenders. you have all had that kid. he needs role models, job training, and real jobs. i was happy to hear that in the video, nothing stops the bullet like a job. we need to provide that. bobbie ann smiley did not ask for their f
. alameda had its own electrical system. these are various projects. los angeles storm drain system. they raised the dam. your water is a product of pw a. they built the sacramento water reservoir. the fans were so well built that in fact, they are still in use. the engineers said we have to replace a ball bearing. we of course, have neglected our infrainstruct our and it's rated to be a d and dropping. so if you don't pay your taxes, things do fall down. much of it is things that were built during the new deal. fortunately, they built them very well. so the stuff was really built to last. but, if you don't have taxes to run a state. i expect we will see more of that stuff. i will give you a brief tour that we take for granted. the commitment to public education in all its manifestations. public schools from kindergarten to higher education. there are thousand of new deal schools built within less than ten years. many have art work in or on them. this is berkeley high school. you shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. the schools are always telling you that public e
seconds left, los angeles, this is a city, los angeles, california. and what it shows are some of the districting lines there. and it's having problems. thank you.
there was not a large population here. i moved from los angeles and it's grown 50,000 people in those years. i don't want to see it grow further per se and i'm not a fan of developing more housing but to answer the question if we add more housing i would say loosen up the rules to allow homeowners to create inlaw apartments and that way you open up unit availability at some level for additional housing. other than that i would be opposed to any new construction of any major land use of development for housing including the three major projects in the pipeline. >> mr. rogers. >> if there is going to be development it could be in the trans bays terminal that is truly close to rapid transit. walking distance to bart. walking distance to the train that heads down south. this would be an ideal place for a development to occur. a place like park merced where you have 17,000 people would be moving in there. 6,000 parking stalls, a car dependent project, right next to 19th avenue. you folks know how bad that is. how would it be better if we had more people living in park merced? i don't think so.
-president -- the vice- president visited the united states and i traveled to los angeles with our mayor at the time and what an event. and now a few months later, san francisco is probably hosting the seminar with the ministry of commerce. it shows that our golden mountain continues to attract chinese. has never stopped since the 1800's and because san francisco continues to be the city of innovation and full of peril spirit, we will continue to seek an inflow of inbound chinese businessmen and investors. may i invite our mayor, edwin lee, to the podium? [applause] >> thank you. good morning. i want to of course repeat our warm welcome, ladies and gentleman, to the vice minister and his delegation here. to the council general and his wonderful work and to our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom is here. our senior adviser, mr. rossi and those of you from fremont and san jose and around the bay area, thank you for being here on this first china-united states state and regional economic and trade discussion. as you know, san francisco has been home to the biggest and the oldest chinatown in the united
of washington d.c. this is right outside of the co-op. and then urban roads like this in the los angeles river and this is being built. this is mira loma park. this is lark merced blvd. it's all made of clay. it's going to slump. these are the roads built in the oakland hills. nate, red woods. skyline. and enabled them to go up and develop the hills. the rural roads that go through the coast range. this enabled them to get their stuff to market. this is at road built by the ccc. this is a bridge. this is highway one and you won't know, except you look at the bridge and you will see dates, 1938, 1939. the airstrips are ccc. and the one out at treasure island. long beach, burbank. this is oakland and the whole built line railroad was redone. 19 is a pwa project and our great amphitheatres are from that time. this is santa barbara bowl. this is the forest theater in carmel and these are ccc workers putting huge bolder. here's 6 thousand people getting ready to enjoy oklahoma in that theater. big basin is a ccc project and this one, on the east river, new york. a project built where people from th
working in los angeles. after being a patrol officer for just a few months, you are placed on gang detail. you have arrested a youth. instead of taking him to jail, you taken to his mother. the mother says, can you make him more afraid of you that of the gang members? the academy does not prepare you for that. i take that experience and i realized in the gang environment, most of these youths are coming from single- family households. in the area where the gang violence is most prevalent, great citizens of the community, 99% of those citizens are afraid. as a prosecutor, i take this experience and figure out how i want to enforce gang violence, especially in san francisco. i break it down into three categories. you have the individual who is not fully immersed in the gang lifestyle. he is just an associate comment just hanging out. -- associates, just hanging out. for that individual, we try to work with community-based programs. i've met with dcyf, the african- american steering committee, people haven't been in this violence and i say to them, what can -- people have been in this violen
. in population centers like los angeles, the scope of the task is staggering. the hyperion wastewater treatment plant serves four million people. it processes 350 million gallons of sewage and removes 500 tons of solids daily. after treatment at hyperion, what was once raw sewage is clean enough to release into santa monica bay. other cities and towns release treated wastewater, or effluent, into local rivers, lakes, and streams. as it flows downstream, additional cities may capture it for drinking water, consume it, and treat the water again. in other words, the water coming out of a wastewater treatment plant often enters the watershed, flows into intakes of drinking water treatment plants, and eventually finds its way right back to our faucets. it takes huge investments to ensure that wastewater and drinking water treatment plants function properly to maintain a safe water supply. we made the initial investments in the plants and the pipes. but once we accomplished that, there was this great recognition that we had a series of issues associated with wet weather conditions. storm events where
marymount college in los angeles. i had a scholarship to play baseball down there. ended up going to ireland and getting a master's degree at university college dublin. came back to the states and went to law school at the university of pennsylvania. spent three years in philadelphia. came back, and ever since coming back to the bay area, professionally, i have been a corporate attorney down at palo alto. i left after about three years and became an investment banker here in san francisco at thomas was all partners. working the industry for about five and a half years. in the summer of 2009, joined a venture capital firm. i am happily married. my wife and i lived around laurel village in district 2. we have two small children. our goal is five and our boy is three. how parents and excited to be here on the board. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? and tell us about what motivated your interest in politics. >> choosing to live in san francisco was natural, given that i was born and raised here. when you are a child, you do not understand what you have until you leave home. i have
. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor c
. it is a public defender. this is someone who worked as a public defender for 19 years in los angeles. she is now director of legal services. now i'm going to embarrass her. her name is ellie miller. there she is. [applause] public defenders are legal ministers. you are. you are part of this picture. ok. i will go back to what i was supposed to be doing, forgive me. i am going to -- we have heard everybody's contribution. now i want to talk about what is working and what is not working. i am going to ask each of the members to speak the truth to one another. let me direct some early remarks. you have suffered unimaginable pain. i will make an assumption that i can speak for the audience in singing, cannot imagine what would be like to be is a child. from that pain, from your community organizing, what do you say to the commander? it is not 1996 any more. what is going on? what do you say to him? what does he say to you? i will ask you to keep the remarks brief. commander, i will give you a chance to respond. you are hearing about all these things, what is your reaction? >> there needs to be more
. i think los angeles, where i'm from, there was no supervision for misdemeanors by the probation department. those individuals were on court summary probation which meant go home and sin no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, w
sacramento, los angeles, from all the communities in between, thank you for coming to our fantastic city to celebrate our asian-pacific heritage month. it is my pleasure to also provide you with a warm welcome and thank you for somebody who worked on this idea to bring everybody here to san francisco, my very good friend. thank you. where are you? when we first talked about this, we said there had to be the place where everybody felt comfortable. there had to be a place where we could feel the excitement of all very different asian american groups. we had to have a place where something wonderful had been accomplished. a leadership change, one that we never thought in our lifetimes. by the way, as you know, i never thought in our lifetimes we would see an african-american president of the united states. what a wonderful location, that is something to celebrate. he has been here many times, president obama. the very surprised we had of being able to celebrate the first asian mayor of san francisco. it was not my doing, it was all of the people of san francisco saying it is about time we c
of $100 million. to get these charging stations in throughout the bay area and down the coast to los angeles. they sold 5000 electric cars and they want to keep expanding. problem, permits. some people are making it hard, some cds are making it too difficult to get these charging stations up and running. we will deal with that city by city and we will have success. secondly, the utility's charge various fees to set up and provide the electricity. we want to make sure that it is cost recovery and to not be unreasonable. we meet with them if their problem and we react. through the public utilities commission, through local regulation, we react and try to do everything we can to solve problems. if you are talking about deals like if you come to california, we will pay 7000 for any job, we have a little bit of that but it is hard to pay people for their business activities. we do not have enough money. they're doing that all over the state. cutting deals. we are doing that in some respects. it is our race. how does michigan spent so much subsidy attracting -- michigan is not doing that w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)